Testing

Every application should be well tested. Actix provides tools to perform unit and integration tests.

Unit tests

For unit testing, actix provides a request builder type and a simple handler runner. TestRequest implements a builder-like pattern. You can generate a HttpRequest instance with finish(), or you can run your handler with run() or run_async().

# extern crate actix_web;
use actix_web::{http, test, HttpRequest, HttpResponse, HttpMessage};

fn index(req: HttpRequest) -> HttpResponse {
     if let Some(hdr) = req.headers().get(http::header::CONTENT_TYPE) {
        if let Ok(s) = hdr.to_str() {
            return HttpResponse::Ok().into()
        }
     }
     HttpResponse::BadRequest().into()
}

fn main() {
    let resp = test::TestRequest::with_header("content-type", "text/plain")
        .run(index)
        .unwrap();
    assert_eq!(resp.status(), http::StatusCode::OK);

    let resp = test::TestRequest::default()
        .run(index)
        .unwrap();
    assert_eq!(resp.status(), http::StatusCode::BAD_REQUEST);
}

Integration tests

There are several methods for testing your application. Actix provides TestServer, which can be used to run the application with specific handlers in a real http server.

TestServer::get(), TestServer::post(), and TestServer::client() methods can be used to send requests to the test server.

A simple form TestServer can be configured to use a handler. TestServer::new method accepts a configuration function, and the only argument for this function is a test application instance.

Check the api documentation for more information.

# extern crate actix_web;
use actix_web::{HttpRequest, HttpMessage};
use actix_web::test::TestServer;
use std::str;

fn index(req: HttpRequest) -> &'static str {
     "Hello world!"
}

fn main() {
    let mut srv = TestServer::new(|app| app.handler(index));  // <- Start new test server

    let request = srv.get().finish().unwrap();                // <- create client request
    let response = srv.execute(request.send()).unwrap();      // <- send request to the server
    assert!(response.status().is_success());                  // <- check response

    let bytes = srv.execute(response.body()).unwrap();        // <- read response body
    let body = str::from_utf8(&bytes).unwrap();               // <- convert to a string
    assert_eq!(body, "Hello world!");
}

The other option is to use an application factory. In this case, you need to pass the factory function the same way as you would for real http server configuration.

# extern crate actix_web;
use actix_web::{http, test, App, HttpRequest, HttpResponse};

fn index(req: HttpRequest) -> HttpResponse {
     HttpResponse::Ok().into()
}

/// This function get called by http server.
fn create_app() -> App {
    App::new()
        .resource("/test", |r| r.h(index))
}

fn main() {
    let mut srv = test::TestServer::with_factory(create_app); // <- Start new test server

    let request = srv.client(
         http::Method::GET, "/test").finish().unwrap();       // <- create client request
    let response = srv.execute(request.send()).unwrap();      // <- send request to the server

    assert!(response.status().is_success());                  // <- check response
}

If you need more complex application configuration, use the TestServer::build_with_state() method. For example, you may need to initialize application state or start SyncActor's for diesel interation. This method accepts a closure that constructs the application state, and it runs when the actix system is configured. Thus, you can initialize any additional actors.

#[test]
fn test() {
    let srv = TestServer::build_with_state(|| { // <- construct builder with config closure
        // we can start diesel actors
        let addr = SyncArbiter::start(3, || {
            DbExecutor(SqliteConnection::establish("test.db").unwrap())
        });
        // then we can construct custom state, or it could be `()`
        MyState{addr: addr}
   })
   .start(|app| {      // <- register server handlers and start test server
        app.resource(
            "/{username}/index.html", |r| r.with(
                |p: Path<PParam>| format!("Welcome {}!", p.username)));
    });
    
    // now we can run our test code
);

WebSocket server tests

It is possible to register a handler with TestApp::handler(), which initiates a web socket connection. TestServer provides the method ws(), which connects to the websocket server and returns ws reader and writer objects. TestServer also provides an execute() method, which runs future objects to completion and returns result of the future computation.

The following example demonstrates how to test a websocket handler:

# extern crate actix;
# extern crate actix_web;
# extern crate futures;
# extern crate http;
# extern crate bytes;

use actix_web::*;
use futures::Stream;
# use actix::prelude::*;

struct Ws;   // <- WebSocket actor

impl Actor for Ws {
    type Context = ws::WebsocketContext<Self>;
}

impl StreamHandler<ws::Message, ws::ProtocolError> for Ws {

    fn handle(&mut self, msg: ws::Message, ctx: &mut Self::Context) {
        match msg {
            ws::Message::Text(text) => ctx.text(text),
            _ => (),
        }
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut srv = test::TestServer::new(             // <- start our server with ws handler
        |app| app.handler(|req| ws::start(req, Ws)));

    let (reader, mut writer) = srv.ws().unwrap();    // <- connect to ws server

    writer.text("text");                             // <- send message to server

    let (item, reader) = srv.execute(reader.into_future()).unwrap();  // <- wait for one message
    assert_eq!(item, Some(ws::Message::Text("text".to_owned())));
}